Mao: The Unknown Story


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Javascript is not enabled in your browser. Enabling JavaScript in your browser will allow you to experience all the features of our site. Learn how to enable JavaScript on your browser. NOOK Book. It is full of startling revelations, exploding the myth of the Long March, and showing a completely unknown Mao: he was not driven by idealism or ideology; his intimate and intricate relationship with Stalin went back to the s, ultimately bringing him to power; he welcomed Japanese occupation of much of China; and he schemed, poisoned, and blackmailed to get his way.

After Mao conquered China in , his secret goal was to dominate the world. In chasing this dream he caused the deaths of 38 million people in the greatest famine in history. She was born in China in and moved to Britain in She lives in London. He has written or edited eight previous books.

He was born into a peasant family in a valley called Shaoshan, in the province of Hunan, in the heartland of China.

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Mao: The Unknown Story

The date was 26 December His ancestors had lived in the valley for five hundred years. This was a world of ancient beauty, a temperate, humid region whose misty, undulating hills had been populated ever since the Neolithic age. Buddhist temples dating from the Tang dynasty ad — , when Buddhism first came here, were still in use. Forests where nearly species of trees grew, including maples, camphor, metasequoia and the rare ginkgo, covered the area and sheltered the tigers, leopards and boar that still roamed the hills. The last tiger was killed in These hills, with neither roads nor navigable rivers, detached the village from the world at large.

Even as late as the early twentieth century an event as momentous as the death of the emperor in did not percolate this far, and Mao found out only two years afterwards when he left Shaoshan.

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The valley of Shaoshan measures about 5 by 3. The odd families who lived there grew rice, tea and bamboo, harnessing buffalo to plough the rice paddies. Daily life revolved round these age-old activities.

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At the age of ten he was engaged to a girl of thirteen from a village about 10 kilometres away, beyond a pass called Tiger Resting Pass, where tigers used to sun themselves. This short distance was long enough in those years for the two villages to speak dialects that were almost mutually unintelligible. In accordance with centuries of custom, her feet had been crushed and bound to produce the so-called three-inch golden lilies that epitomised beauty at the time.

It was arranged by their parents and was based on a practical consideration: the tomb of one of her grandfathers was in Shaoshan, and it had to be tended regularly with elaborate rituals, so having a relative there would prove useful. Seventh Sister Wen moved in with the Maos upon betrothal, and was married at the age of eighteen, in , when Yi-chang was fifteen. Shortly after the wedding, Yi-chang went off to be a soldier to earn money to pay off family debts, which he was able to do after several years.

Chinese peasants were not serfs but free farmers, and joining the army for purely financial reasons was an established practice. Luckily he was not involved in any wars; instead he caught a glimpse of the world and picked up some business ideas. Unlike most of the villagers, Yi-chang could read and write, well enough to keep accounts. After his return, he raised pigs, and processed grain into top-quality rice to sell at a nearby market town. He bought back the land his father had pawned, then bought more land, and became one of the richest men in the village.

Though relatively well off, Yi-chang remained extremely hard- working and thrifty all his life. The family house consisted of half a dozen rooms, which occupied one wing of a large thatched property. Eventually Yi-chang replaced the thatch with tiles, a major improvement, but left the mud floor and mud walls.

The windows had no glass—still a rare luxury—and were just square openings with wooden bars, blocked off at night by wooden boards the temperature hardly ever fell below freezing. The furniture was simple: wooden beds, bare wooden tables and benches. It was in one of these rather spartan rooms, under a pale blue homespun cotton quilt, inside a blue mosquito net, that Mao was born.

Mao was the third son, but the first to survive beyond infancy. His Buddhist mother became even more devout to encourage Buddha to protect him. Mao was given the two-part name Tse-tung. These names reflected the inveterate aspiration of Chinese peasants for their sons to do well—and the expectation that they could.

Mao: The Unknown Story by Jung Chang, Jon Halliday |, Paperback | Barnes & Noble®

High positions were open to all through education, which for centuries meant studying Confucian classics. Excellence would enable young men of any background to pass imperial examinations and become mandarins—all the way up to becoming prime minister. Officialdom was the definition of achievement, and the names given to Mao and his brothers expressed the hopes placed on them. But a grand name was also onerous and potentially tempted fate, so most children were given a pet name that was either lowly or tough, or both.

After Mao performed obeisance and kowtows, he was considered adopted by the rock. Mao was very fond of this name, and continued to use it as an adult. Shall we wait for her? She was a gentle and tolerant person, who, as he remembered, never raised her voice to him. From her came his full face, sensual lips, and a calm self-possession in the eyes. Mao would talk about his mother with emotion all his life. It was in her footsteps that he became a Buddhist as a child. Wherever my mother went, I would follow.

The Unknown Story

Because my mother believed in Buddha, so did I. Mao had a carefree childhood.


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There his maternal grandmother doted on him. His two uncles and their wives treated him like their own son, and one of them became his Adopted Father, the Chinese equivalent to godfather. Mao did a little light farm work, gathering fodder for pigs and taking the buffaloes out for a stroll in the tea-oil camellia groves by a pond shaded by banana leaves. In later years he would reminisce with fondness about this idyllic time. He started learning to read, while his aunts spun and sewed under an oil lamp.

Confucian classics, which made up most of the curriculum, were beyond the understanding of children and had to be learnt by heart. Mao was blessed with an exceptional memory, and did well. His fellow pupils remembered a diligent boy who managed not only to recite but also to write by rote these difficult texts. He also gained a foundation in Chinese language and history, and began to learn to write good prose, calligraphy and poetry, as writing poems was an essential part of Confucian education.

Reading became a passion.


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  4. Peasants generally turned in at sunset, to save on oil for lamps, but Mao would read deep into the night, with an oil lamp standing on a bench outside his mosquito net. Years later, when he was supreme ruler of China, half of his huge bed would be piled a foot high with Chinese classics, and he littered his speeches and writings with historical references.

    But his poems lost flair.

    Jade and Plastic

    Mao clashed frequently with his tutors. He ran away from his first school at the age of ten, claiming that the teacher was a martinet. All his life, he was vague about figures, and hopeless at economics.

    Mao: The Unknown Story

    Nor did he take kindly to hard physical labour. He shunned it as soon as his peasant days were over. Yi-chang could not stand Mao being idle. Having spent every minute of his waking hours working, he expected his son to do the same, and would strike him when he did not comply. Mao hated his father. Mao was not a mere victim of his father. He fought back, and was often the victor. He would tell his father that the father, being older, should do more manual labour than he, the younger—which was an unthinkably insolent argument by Chinese standards.

    One day, according to Mao, father and son had a row in front of guests. This infuriated me.

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    Mao: The Unknown Story Mao: The Unknown Story
    Mao: The Unknown Story Mao: The Unknown Story
    Mao: The Unknown Story Mao: The Unknown Story
    Mao: The Unknown Story Mao: The Unknown Story
    Mao: The Unknown Story Mao: The Unknown Story

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