Forbidden Prayer: Church Censorship and Devotional Literature in Renaissance Italy


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A Convent Tale. Renee Baernstein. Isabella d'Este and Francesco Gonzaga. Sarah D.

1 The Unbounded Nature of Domestic Space

John Monfasani. The French Descent into Renaissance Italy, — David Abulafia. Transformations of Late Antiquity. Manolis Papoutsakis. Guardians of Republicanism. Mark Jurdjevic. Michaelangelo: Selected Readings. William Wallace. Collecting Art in the Italian Renaissance Court. Leah R. Jon R. Frances Andrews. Hollow Men. Susan Gaylard. Patronage and Dynasty. Ian F. Lyric Poetry by Women of the Italian Renaissance. Virginia Cox. Dante in Oxford. Tristan Kay. The Intellectual Struggle for Florence. Arthur Field.

Italy in Crisis. Luca Marenzio. Marco Bizzarini. Women in Italian Renaissance Culture and Society. Letizia Panizza. The Sword and the Pen.

here

Introduction

Konrad Eisenbichler. Forms of Faith in Sixteenth-Century Italy. Matthew Treherne. Abigail Brundin. The Invisible Wall. Harry Bernstein. Not in God's Name.

The English Historical Review 128 (2013), 534

Jonathan Sacks. Layered Wisdom. Valentina Lepri.

Art and Love in Renaissance Italy - Curatorial Talk - Part 2 of 3

Studies on Alberti and Petrarch. David Marsh. Conversion to Catholicism in Early Modern Italy. Peter A. God and the Gay Christian. Matthew Vines. Authority, Innovation and Early Modern Epistemology. Martin McLaughlin. From Florence to the Heavenly City. Stefano Dall'Aglio. Stone Cold. Martin Dillon. X, pp. Simoncelli, Evangelismo italiano, chap. Firpo, Gli affreschi di Pontormo, pp.

A2r , Giovanni di Dio warmly recommended that people should read the work ibid. De Bujanda, Index des livres interdits, vol. On the long lists and the Indexes of these years, cf. LX, pp. De unione animae cum supereminenti lumine. Opera nuova et utile ad ogni fidel Christiano. Simoncelli corroborates this hypothesis, indicating, on the basis of a Franciscan chronicle of , the existence of two other works by Cordoni which presumably circulated in manuscript form ibid. Stanislao da Campagnola believes that the edition edited by Girolamo da Molfetta was based on a manuscript that was not the same as that used by Ilarione, i.

Simoncelli put 42 www. Ochino himself, than out of any effective inward maturing of thought, a hasty decision that it is not unreasonable to suppose was one of the reasons that drove Molfetta to his dramatic decision to commit suicide. Documenti e testimonianze del primo secolo, C.


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Cargnoni ed. But the difference of approach and content between the two works is evident from the very first reading. Cargnoni mentions a different edition of the treatise in La seconda parte delle prediche di M. Sermones Bernardini Ochini, cc.

Forbidden Prayer

E3r—v; on which cf. Popkin, G. Ricuperati, L. B5r; c. B6r; and also cc. A7r; but cf. The Venetian edition of did, however, still contain the anonymous Circolo del divino amore. This is what emerges, in particular, from the censures prepared by the Capuchin Evangelista Canobio, now kept among the Protocols of the Congregation of the Index. A7v ; the same expression is used by Ochino a few pages further on, on c. Without going into all the insidious intricacies of the text,65 we will simply point out the objective difficulty encountered by the Capuchin censor, occupied as he was trying to see his way through the theological and doctrinal subtleties of a work which stood at a point where heretical traditions of various origin and background all flowed together.

The simultaneous presence of theological elements going back to the beghard tradition of the Free Spirit and of doctrinal traces of clearly Lutheran descent prevented the censor from providing a unitary and organic interpretation of the text, compelling him to proceed passage by passage and sentence by sentence without any attempt at a global understanding of the work, and in some cases had the effect of misleading this Capuchin friar, for all his care and attention.

Patribus Theologis ut praedictos libellum de unione anime et tractatum Circuii charitatis divinae diligenter examinarent, ac demum intellectis in Congregatione praedicta propositionibus per praedictos Theologos notatis, consideratisque censuris eorundem theologorum mature desuper factis, ac per eosdem relatis, indicaverunt praedictos libellum de unione animae, et dictum Epilogum [ Cargnoni, Fonti, tendenze, p.

Forbidding Prayer in Italy and Spain: Censorship and Pages 1 - 22 - Text Version | FlipHTML5

Cargnoni, Fonti, tendenze, pp. For Canobio was unable to appreciate how, in the mystic circular course that it was thought would conduct man to his union with God, the author distinguished two quite separate moments. The first of these coincided with the phase that is commonly defined as that of annihilation, when through contemplation of the object of his desire God , man — maintaining his free will — succeeds in ridding himself of all the affections and ties that bind him to the terrestrial world, reaching the point where he desires for himself only nothingness.

The contradiction, in other words, was only apparent: the result of a mechanical, but culpable, juxtaposition of two expressions taken out of their original context; or else, more simply, it was the result of a certain amount of comprehensible confusion on the part of the censor himself.

His Lutheranocentric vision was possibly less sophisticated in its manner of interpretation but it had the virtue of putting clearly into focus the danger lurking in these pages.


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  5. The doctrinal enemy was already well identified and defined: the devaluation of human free will and the consequent devaluation of good works for the purposes of eternal salvation; the certainty of salvation and the state of impeccability guaranteed by the union with God. Once having overcome 68 Ibid. An expression is borrowed here that was used by A. The purpose of his next observation had the same objective.

    Forbidden Prayer: Church Censorship and Devotional Literature in Renaissance Italy Forbidden Prayer: Church Censorship and Devotional Literature in Renaissance Italy
    Forbidden Prayer: Church Censorship and Devotional Literature in Renaissance Italy Forbidden Prayer: Church Censorship and Devotional Literature in Renaissance Italy
    Forbidden Prayer: Church Censorship and Devotional Literature in Renaissance Italy Forbidden Prayer: Church Censorship and Devotional Literature in Renaissance Italy
    Forbidden Prayer: Church Censorship and Devotional Literature in Renaissance Italy Forbidden Prayer: Church Censorship and Devotional Literature in Renaissance Italy
    Forbidden Prayer: Church Censorship and Devotional Literature in Renaissance Italy Forbidden Prayer: Church Censorship and Devotional Literature in Renaissance Italy
    Forbidden Prayer: Church Censorship and Devotional Literature in Renaissance Italy Forbidden Prayer: Church Censorship and Devotional Literature in Renaissance Italy

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